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2013
Impact Factor

Scott Kelly

Scott   Kelly
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 USA
University of North Carolina, USA

Associate professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Born: January 24, 1969
1991: B.S., Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.
1992: M.S., Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.
1998: Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Research:

 

Differential geometric methods in analytical mechanics Biologically-inspired robotic locomotion in fluids Nonlinear dynamics and control problems in systems biology

Honors & Awards:

2005: National Science Foundation CAREER Award
2006: Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE)
2007: UIUC Engineering Council Excellence in Undergraduate Advising Award
August 2007 – July 2010: Charlotte Research Institute Fellow

Professional Affiliations:

 

American Mathematical Society American Physical Society Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Federation of Nonlinear Analysts Mathematical Association of America Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Publications:

Tallapragada P., Kelly S. D.
Dynamics and Self-Propulsion of a Spherical Body Shedding Coaxial Vortex Rings in an Ideal Fluid
2013, vol. 18, no. 1-2, pp.  21-32
Abstract
We describe a model for the dynamic interaction of a sphere with uniform density and a system of coaxial circular vortex rings in an ideal fluid of equal density. At regular intervals in time, a constraint is imposed that requires the velocity of the fluid relative to the sphere to have no component transverse to a particular circular contour on the sphere. In order to enforce this constraint, new vortex rings are introduced in a manner that conserves the total momentum in the system. This models the shedding of rings from a sharp physical ridge on the sphere coincident with the circular contour. If the position of the contour is fixed on the sphere, vortex shedding is a source of drag. If the position of the contour varies periodically, propulsive rings may be shed in a manner that mimics the locomotion of certain jellyfish. We present simulations representing both cases.
Keywords: fluid-body interactions, vortex rings, aquatic locomotion
Citation: Tallapragada P., Kelly S. D.,  Dynamics and Self-Propulsion of a Spherical Body Shedding Coaxial Vortex Rings in an Ideal Fluid, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics, 2013, vol. 18, no. 1-2, pp. 21-32
DOI:10.1134/S1560354713010024

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